• Amarillo Biosciences Inc., of Amarillo, Texas, reported several corporate developments, including results of an Italian study that confirms the efficacy of its natural human interferon-alpha in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus. Data showed that survival of interferon-treated cats was significantly prolonged, and opportunistic infections were decreased, compared to placebo. Amarillo said it is seeking funding to further research in treating oral warts, an opportunistic infection in HIV-positive patients.

• BioWa Inc., of Princeton, N.J., and Aphton Corp., of Philadelphia, signed a deal granting Aphton’s wholly owned subsidiary, Igeneon, a nonexclusive license to use BioWa’s Potelligent technology for the development of IGN312, a humanized monoclonal Lewis Y-specific antibody. Igeneon is developing IGN312 as a next-generation antibody based on IGN311, which is in a Phase I/II trial in patients with Lewis Y-positive cancers. Potelligent reduces the amount of fucose in the carbohydrate structure of an antibody.

• Cepheid, of Sunnyvale, Calif., entered a collaboration with the Public Health Agency of Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory to develop in-field nucleic acid assays for Ebola, Marburg and Lassa fever viruses using the firm’s GeneXpert technology. Under the agreement, Cepheid and the Public Health Agency of Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory have been awarded C$780,000 (US$676,810) over a two-year period to develop the assays.

• CytoDyn Inc., of Santa Fe, N.M., signed a letter of intent with Timeway International Inc., for a joint venture in China. The project would develop Cytolin, CytoDyn’s targeted immune therapy for HIV/AIDS. Timeway, with offices in Phoenix, Hong Kong, Bejing and Shanghai, has teamed with a few U.S. biotech firms to bring non-competing medical technologies to China, it said.

• Epitomics Inc., of Burlingame, Calif., and Biocare Medical LLC, of Concord, Calif., entered a strategic alliance to develop reagent products for the immunohistochemistry clinical diagnostic market. The multiyear agreement would allow Biocare to use Epitomics’ novel rabbit monoclonal antibody technology platform to develop reagents and reagent test kits. Epitomics will supply the rabbit monoclonal antibodies to Biocare, which will develop a line of test kits incorporating single, double and triple stains.

• Evotec AG, of Hamburg, Germany, and Apeiron Biologics GmbH, of Vienna, Austria, signed a deal to develop small molecules targeting a concept for pain relief. During the initial phase of the collaboration, the companies will jointly develop tailored biochemical and cellular assays, and Evotec will aim to identify hit molecules. The companies then will focus on identifying a lead compound to take into preclinical development and through proof-of-concept studies.

• Genmab A/S, of Copenhagen, Denmark, acquired exclusive worldwide rights to angiogenesis targets identified by Adelaide, Australia-based Bionomics Ltd. to develop therapeutics for cancer and other diseases. Under the terms, Bionomics will receive an up-front fee, plus milestones and potential royalties.

• Geron Corp., of Menlo Park, Calif., and Cambrex Bio Science Walkersville Inc., of East Rutherford, N.J., a subsidiary of Cambrex Corp., disclosed an agreement for the manufacture of Geron’s GRNVAC1 telomerase vaccine. The deal provides for the transfer of Geron’s vaccine production process to Cambrex and the cGMP manufacture of GRNVAC1 by Cambrex. GRNVAC1, which has completed a Phase I/II trial from which results were published last year, comprises autologous dendritic cells loaded ex vivo with telomerase mRNA.

• Illumina Inc., of San Diego, was awarded a genotyping services contract by SAIC-Frederick Inc., under prime contract to the National Cancer Institute to perform whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism scans on more than 2,500 prostate case and control samples provided by the institute.

• Viventia Biotech Inc., of Toronto, and Dowpharma contract manufacturing services, a business unit of The Dow Chemical Co., of Midland, Mich., entered a commercial license agreement for a Pseudomonas-based technology from Dowpharma. Viventia will use the technology for up to six different therapeutic compounds, starting with an antibody-based candidate in preclinical development. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Xencor Inc., of Monrovia, Calif., said it granted Malvern, Pa.-based Centocor Research and Development Inc. a nonexclusive license to its ImmunoFilter technology to evaluate the potential immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins. Xencor granted Centocor a multiyear license in exchange for annual license fees. Specific terms were not disclosed.

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