• 3ClinicalResearch AG, of Berlin, was acquired byParexel International Corp., of Boston. A clinical research organization with expertise in Phase I and Phase IIa proof-of-concept studies, 3C has Phase I/IIa facilities at the Charite University Hospital in Berlin and in Hennigsdorf, Germany. Parexel said it has been affiliated with 3C for years, having established a minority ownership stake in the entity in June 2000. It acquired the remaining outstanding shares in March for about $12 million.

• Adprotech Ltd., of Cambridge, UK, was acquired by Inflazyme Pharmaceuticals Ltd., of Vancouver, British Columbia. Inflazyme issued about 12.7 million shares in exchange for all of the issued and outstanding shares of Adprotech. Adprotech shareholders now will hold about 12 percent of the outstanding Inflazyme shares. Adprotech shareholders agreed to lock up their shares, which will be released on a percentage basis from a date four months after completion of the acquisition. Shareholders in privately held Adprotech agreed in early April to be taken over by Inflazyme for about C$20 million (US$14.9 million) in shares. (See BioWorld International, April 14, 2004.)

• AusBiotech, Australia's biotechnology industry organization, provided A$83 million (US$60.7 million) to biotech and pharmaceutical companies through its Pharmaceutical Partnerships Program (P3). The P3 initiative is structured to increase the participation of companies in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and generics industries in order to encourage partnerships across the sectors. Among the companies that received funding were Acrux Ltd., of Melbourne, Australia; AGT Biosciences Ltd., of Victoria, Australia; Amrad Corp. Ltd., of Melbourne; CSL Ltd., of Melbourne; Mayne Pharmaceuticals, of Melbourne; Novogen Ltd., of Sydney, Australia; and Pharmaxis Ltd., also of Sydney.

• BioGeneriX AG, of Mannheim, Germany, and Neose Technologies Inc., of Horsham, Pa., signed an agreement to use Neose's GlycoPEGylation technology to develop a long-acting, next-generation version of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). They will share preclinical expenses, and BioGeneriX will fund the clinical development program. Neose, which is receiving an up-front fee, will have commercial rights in the U.S., Canada, Mexico and Japan. BioGeneriX will have commercial rights in Europe and the rest of the world. Each company will receive royalties on sales in the other company's territory. Separately, Neose delayed plans to file an investigational new drug application for GlycoPEG-EPO to the second quarter of next year. The company stressed that the delay is not connected to any concerns over the product, but is required to increase post-purification output.

• BioInvent International AB, of Lund, Denmark, plans to commence toxicology studies with its first candidate drug, an antibody that targets a conserved site on the HIV Tat protein, which the virus requires for its replication and spread. It also has developed a cell line for large-scale production of the compound. BioInvent reported SEK240.5 million (US$31.3 million) in cash and equivalents at the end of the first quarter.

• Bodisen Biotech Inc., of Yang Ling, China, received $3.6 million in contracts from nine customers for product delivery this year. As a result, the company broke ground on a new manufacturing facility to double its production from 100,000 metric tons of organic fertilizer per year to 200,000. The new facility is expected to be operational in the fourth quarter, and will include a research facility to allow Bodisen to expand its research and development efforts.

• Evotec OAI AG, of Hamburg, Germany, and Oxford Bioscience Partners, of Boston, a venture capital firm, expanded their 2002 agreement by integrating Evotec's newly established rational drug design platform, EVOrationale. EVOrationale consists of protein engineering and production, X-ray crystallography and computational chemistry to assist customers in delivering de novo structure determination, validation of screening hits and structure-guided lead optimization programs.

• FEI Co., of Eindhoven, the Netherlands, said it will join the European Union-funded Interaction Proteome project, which was coordinated by the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany. The project, which is receiving €12 million over five years, brings together the science of 11 European research institutions and companies to develop technologies for proteomics research. FEI will collaborate to develop instruments with improved sensitivity to the analysis of protein complexes within the cell.

• GeneProt Inc., of Geneva, established a collaboration with H. Lundbeck A/S, of Copenhagen, Denmark, to study the proteomics of biofluid samples taken from a rodent model of central nervous system disease. GeneProt will apply its MicroProt process to the samples, and Lundbeck will have exclusive rights to commercialize the results. GeneProt's technology is used to analyze polypeptides and smaller proteins. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Genmab A/S, of Copenhagen, Denmark, agreed to license a cancer target called GT43 from privately held Ganymed Pharmaceuticals AG, of Mainz, Germany. The target is expressed in a range of tumors, including melanoma, breast cancer, lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. Ganymed will be entitled to license fees, milestones and royalties on the sale of commercialized products.

• The German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) will invest up to €14 million over the next three years in 22 projects related to tissue engineering. The ministry intends to support products related to regenerating organs and other tissue, alleviating complaints such as cartilage injuries, nerve damage or burn scars. The BMBF said 39 German companies operate in the field, making Germany the European leader.

• Immuno-Designed Molecules SA, of Paris, opened its first U.S. cGMP production center in Irvine, Calif. The site, which will be dedicated to the production of Cell Drugs intended for IDM-sponsored clinical trials in North America, received a manufacturing license from the California Department of Health Services. The first Cell Drugs being prepared in Irvine are for a clinical trial using Collidem, IDM's product candidate to treat colorectal cancer. The product process began in January.

• Japan Tobacco Inc., of Tokyo, granted Ceres Inc., of Los Angeles, a commercial license to PureIntro, a transformation tool for commercializing plants and plant-based products. Financial terms were not disclosed. Privately held Ceres is developing plants and plant-based products to benefit human health and agriculture.

• KeyNeurotek AG, of Magdeburg, Germany, secured €5 million in its second round of venture investment. The company develops drugs to treat degenerative disorders in the central nervous system. KeyNeurotek will use the new capital to develop its pipeline. The company has at least two compounds that it expects to bring into clinical testing in the next two years. Since KeyNeurotek's founding in 2000, it has raised more than €10 million in investment. The current round was led by IBG Beteiligungsgesellschaft Sachsen-Anhalt mbH, which also led KeyNeurotek's first round.

• Micromet AG, of Munich, Germany, licensed its patent portfolio in single-chain antibodies (SCA) on a global, but nonexclusive basis, to BioInvent International AB, of Stockholm, Sweden. BioInvent will receive a research license to use SCA-based technologies to discover therapeutic or diagnostic products, and will apply it to internal projects as well as external partnerships. Micromet will receive an up-front payment, annual maintenance fees and sub-licensing fees. Micromet will share the revenues with Enzon Inc., of Bridgewater, N.J., under their joint marketing of complementary patent holdings. Exact financial terms of the license were not disclosed.

• Novozymes A/S, of Bagsvaerd, Denmark, received a one-year extension to its collaborative subcontract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and will receive $2.3 million in research funding to further reduce the costs of fuel ethanol to about 10 cents per gallon. The parties found that by combining their technology, the enzyme costs of converting cellulosic biomass into sugars for fuel ethanol product were reduced about 20-fold. NREL and Novozymes entered into a $14.8 million, three-year subcontract agreement in January 2001.

• PharmaMar SA, of Madrid, Spain, said data on Aplidin showed the marine antitumor agent is an inducer of apoptosis in leukemic cells, and is active against human multiple myeloma cell lines and primary multiple myeloma tumor cells isolated from patients. The company plans to begin Phase II trials of Aplidin in multiple myeloma this year in Europe and the U.S. Aplidin is a cyclodepsidpeptide derived from the marine tunicate Aplidium albicans.

• Pharmexa A/S, of H rsholm, Denmark, plans to proceed with a discounted rights issue, having obtained commitments in excess of the minimum amount required in order to enable the transaction to take place. Existing shareholders, H. Lundbeck A/S, of Copenhagen, and joint lead manager ING Investment Bank provided guarantees that they would subscribe to shares valued at DKK102 million (US$16.3 million), DKK2 million above the threshold required. Pharmexa said ING placed about 2.9 million new shares, priced at DKK17 per share, with several European biotechnology investors, including funds managed by RAB Capital and Reabourne Technology Investment Management in London, and Fortis in Brussels, Belgium.

• Pluristem Life Systems Inc., of Haifa, Israel, said it would begin animal model studies of its hematopoietic stem cell expansion technology at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel. The research will focus on conducting stem call repopulation capabilities using the SCI-NOD model, or immune-deficient mice, for analyzing human hematopoietic stem cells.

• Purely Proteins Ltd., of Cambridge, UK, and Inhibox Ltd., of Oxford, UK, launched commercial drug discovery services based on their combined computational and laboratory-based screening technologies. The platform is beginning with the immediate launch of discovery-ready drug screening programs for families of human phosphatases, kinases and proteases.

• RNAx GmbH, of Berlin, signed an agreement with Proligo LLC, of Boulder, Colo., under which RNAx will provide access to RNA interference functional validation technology. Proligo, a unit of Degussa AG, of Dusseldorf, Germany, which will employ the technology for the functional validation of internal siRNA technologies, will own the derived results. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• RNA-TEC NV, of Leuven, Belgium, and Lonza Group Ltd., of Basel, Switzerland, entered an agreement related to TBDMS-based oligonucleotides. The partners, which will make available RNA-synthesis knowledge to others, also are looking for additional synergies related to the field.

• Sanofi-Synthelabo SA, of Paris, entered an agreement to pay more than $63 billion to merge with Aventis SA, of Strasbourg, France, to create Sanofi-Aventis. Aventis' management and board recommended that the company's shareholders tender their shares into Sanofi-Synthelabo's offer, which values each Aventis share at €68.93, should holders choose to receive cash for their shares. They also could choose to receive five Sanofi-Synthelabo shares and €120 in cash for six Aventis shares or about 1.2 Sanofi-Synthelabo shares for each Aventis share. The offer is subject to the condition that shares representing more than 50 percent of the share capital and voting rights of Aventis are tendered, on a fully diluted basis. Prior to the agreement, another Aventis suitor, Novartis AG, of Basel, Switzerland, decided to discontinue negotiations and not submit a bid for a potential combination with Aventis.

• Suzhou Zhongkai Bio-Pharmaceuticals Co. Ltd., of China, and Dragon Pharmaceutical Inc., of Vancouver, British Columbia, entered an agreement to in-license the exclusive right to commercialize its recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) product worldwide, excluding the Peoples' Republic of China. Zhongkai's rhG-CSF is approved in China for an oncology indication. Human G-CSF is a glycoprotein that regulates the production and release of functional neutrophils from bone marrow.

• Tissera Inc., of Tel Aviv, Israel, identified the optimal gestational window to harvest and dissect embryonic tissue in pigs to differentiate between teratoma-producing tissue as opposed to precursor tissue, which leads to heart, liver and pancreas development without teratoma. The specific embryonic anatomical sites that serve as tissue precursors for different organs exhibit different windows.

• Trinity Biotech plc, of Dublin, Ireland, completed its acquisition of Fitzgerald Industries International Inc., of Concord, Mass., for $16 million. The total is paid half in cash and half in Trinity shares. Fitzgerald provides a range of immunodiagnostic products to pharmaceutical companies, reference laboratories, diagnostic manufacturers, universities and research facilities worldwide. Trinity markets more than 500 products for the point-of-care and clinical laboratory segments of the diagnostic market.

• Zeptosens AG, of Witterswil, Switzerland, entered a collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline plc, of London, to develop and supply protein microarrays combining its high-sensitivity planar waveguide system with GSK's analytes and recognition elements. The agreement will enable GSK to specify its microarray requirements in drug discovery and development, Zeptosens said.

• Wilex AG, of Munich, Germany, signed a co-development and marketing agreement for Rencarex in Southern Europe with Laboratorios del Dr. Esteve SA, of Barcelona, Spain. Esteve, which will receive exclusive marketing rights to Rencarex for Spain, Italy, Portugal, Greece and Andorra, will become a co-sponsor in Spain for Wilex's upcoming Phase III trial of Rencarex in renal-cell carcinoma patients. Patient enrollment in that pivotal trial of the chimeric antibody is expected to begin this quarter. Wilex, which will receive an undisclosed up-front payment and is entitled to milestone payments and royalties, will be responsible for Rencarex's clinical development and manufacturing, and for the global regulatory approval process.