• Aderis Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Hopkinton, Mass., set its price range for its initial public offering at $11 to $13 and its number of shares at 6.5 million. Also, the company added Leerink Swann & Co., of Boston, to its underwriters list and removed Gerard Klauer Mattison & Co., of New York. The company initially filed for its IPO in January 2002, but withdrew the offering in August of that year. It had set a price range of $12 to $14. It refiled in August 2003. The company focuses on small molecules to treat central nervous system, cardiovascular and renal disorders. (See BioWorld Today, Aug. 29, 2003.)

• Adventrx Pharmaceuticals Inc., of San Diego, expanded its preclinical testing of BlockAide/VP, a viral entry inhibitor to treat HIV/AIDS. The drug is designed to be a target for the gp-120 protein of HIV by tricking the virus into thinking it has come into contact with the CD4 receptor. Use of the drug in combination with BlockAide/CR has shown an additive effect on HIV inhibition in initial in vitro assays, the company said.

• Affymetrix Inc., of Santa Clara, Calif., reported that it is taking orders for its new GeneChip brand Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array, offering researchers the protein-coding content of the human genome on a single commercially available catalogue microarray.

• Agilent Technologies Inc., of Palo Alto, Calif., entered a multiyear research agreement with the Donald W. Reynolds Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center at Stanford University, also in Palo Alto. Researchers in the collaboration will use Agilent's gene expression technologies and computational methods to analyze cardiovascular tissue samples from human patients to identify, characterize and validate potential diagnostic and drug targets for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Separately, Agilent said it shipped whole human-genome microarrays to customers for testing and evaluation.

• Allos Therapeutics Inc., of Westminster, Colo., submitted to the FDA the second of three data components of the new drug application for its radiation sensitizer, RSR13 (efaproxiral) for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. The first part of the application containing nonclinical information was submitted Aug. 5. The second part contains information about the drug's chemistry, manufacture and controls. The final portion of the NDA will contain the findings from recent clinical studies, which will form the core of the submission, the company said. (See BioWorld Today, May 30, 2003.)

• Anadys Pharmaceuticals Inc., of San Diego, extended an existing chemistry-based collaboration on a F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., of Basel, Switzerland, oncology program. The collaboration was established in August 2002 and called for Anadys to use its structure-assisted drug design technologies and high-output medicinal chemistry to optimize lead compounds identified by Roche against an oncology target. The terms of the initial collaboration called for Roche to make an equity investment in Anadys, as well as provide funding. Anadys could receive milestones and royalty payments. Under the extension agreement, Anadys will receive further funding to deploy its discovery capabilities to advance Roche's lead compounds against the oncology target. Specific financial details were not disclosed. (See BioWorld Today, Aug. 9, 2002.)

• Applied Molecular Evolution Inc., of San Diego, said it achieved a milestone triggered by the filing by MedImmune Inc., of Gaithersburg, Md., of an investigational new drug application with the FDA for Numax in respiratory syncytial virus. A planned Phase I will be designed to assess the safety and tolerability of Numax in healthy volunteers as well as to gather pharmacokinetic and immunogenicity data.

• Arius Research Inc., of Toronto, entered a three-year partnership to discover and develop cancer antibodies with Protein Design Labs Inc., of Fremont, Calif. Arius will receive an up-front technology access fee to discover the antibodies, after which PDL will perform additional validation studies on the candidates. PDL also will have the option to in-license a specified number of antibodies for further development. Arius would receive licensing fees, milestone payments, and a royalty on future sales. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Biomira Inc., of Edmonton, Alberta, completed its financing totaling $16.3 million with Rodman & Renshaw, of New York, acting as exclusive placement agent. The financing was initially reported on Sept. 22. The shares were priced at $1.81, a 7.6 percent premium to the company's average closing price of $1.68 on Nasdaq for the five trading days leading up to and including Sept. 18. Purchasers of common stock received 0.23 percent of one warrant for each share bought. Warrant holders were entitled to buy one share of common stock at $2.30. The warrants will expire Sept. 18, 2005, and there is a no exercise period for six months. Biomira specializes in the development of immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer management. (See BioWorld Today, Sept. 23, 2003.)

• Curis Inc., of Cambridge, Mass., reported that the October online issue of The FASEB Journal contains a preclinical report demonstrating that Hedgehog signaling reduces the activity of nerve cells from the subthalmic nucleus, a region of the brain that is abnormally stimulated in Parkinson's disease. Curis is developing drug candidates that activate the Hedgehog signaling pathway for the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders.

• Cypress Bioscience Inc., of San Diego, called for redemption the outstanding warrants to purchase common stock of the company issued in a March 2002 private placement. As of Oct. 1, there were warrants to purchase about 2.2 million shares of common stock outstanding at an exercise price of $3.09. Each warrant will continue to be exercisable at $3.09 until 5 p.m. on Oct. 17. After that time, holders will have the right to receive the redemption price of 2 cents per warrant.

• Depomed Inc., of Menlo Park, Calif., amended its shelf registration statement filed Sept. 22, to allow for a proposed public offering of 6.5 million shares of Depomed's stock. Depomed also will grant underwriters an option to purchase another 975,000 shares to cover overallotments. Thomas Weisel Partners LLC, CIBC World Markets and Punk Ziegel & Co. will be the managing underwriters for the offering. Thomas Weisel will serve as the sole bookrunner. Depomed said it intends to use proceeds primarily for clinical trials, research and development expenses, marketing and sales expenses, general and administrative expenses and for potential acquisitions of, or investments in, complementary businesses, products and technologies. The company is using its Gastric Retention technology to develop new products and to improve the formulations of existing oral drugs. The company's stock (AMEX:DMI) closed Wednesday at $6.45. Based on that price, the offering would raise $41.9 million.

• Frazier Healthcare Ventures, of Seattle, opened an office in Palo Alto, Calif. Partner Patrick Heron will work out of the Bay Area site, as will two new hires for Frazier - James Topper and Scott Wolf. Most recently, Topper worked as the head of the cardiovascular research and development unit at Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Cambridge, Mass., while Wolf was a founding partner at Scout Medical Technologies, a venture capital incubator developing new life science companies.

• Generex Biotechnology Corp., of Toronto, said a paper from its Antigen Express immunomedicine subsidiary was published in the Oct. 1, 2003, issue of Vaccine. The paper reports progress in developing a peptide vaccine for HIV. The work validates the use of li-Key hybrid peptides as T-helper cell vaccines for HIV, Generex said.

• Hybridon Inc., of Cambridge, Mass., reported the publication of results from a clinical safety study of GEM231, a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide targeted to the RIa regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. The article appears in the Sept. 15, 2003, issue of Clinical Cancer Research. Fourteen cancer patients received escalating doses of GEM231 as a three-day or five-day continuous intravenous infusion. There was low-grade fatigue in 57 percent of patients that was cumulative over four to six weeks of repeated five-day infusions, which reversed at the end of treatment. Medically insignificant, but dose-related, reversible increases in serum transaminases and activated partial thromboplastin times also were observed, it said.

• Myogen Inc., of Westminster, Colo., set the price range for its initial public offering at $14 to $16 per share and its number of shares at 5 million. At that range, the offering would raise between $70 million and $80 million. The company, which will trade on the Nasdaq exchange under the ticker symbol "MYOG," filed for its IPO upon closing a $40 million private investment. (See BioWorld Today, Aug. 29, 2003.)

• Serono SA, of Geneva, Switzerland, broke ground on a $240 million research campus on 10.5 acres in Geneva's Sécheron district. After completion of the first phase of construction, scheduled in 2006, the Serono facility will house about 1,200 employees currently working at other locations.

• SoloHill Engineering Inc., of Ann Arbor, Mich., received a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a unit of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. The company plans to use the funding to expand its development of microcarrier and bioreactor protocols to manufacture human flu vaccines. A primary goal of the two-year grant of $789,879 will be to develop and define cost-effective, large-scale, microcarrier/bioreactor System influenza processing steps for using cell culture technology.

• The Michael J. Fox Foundation in New York said it would fund up to $1 million in its latest program to encourage collaboration in the study of the genetics of Parkinson's disease through its Global Genetics Consortia initiative. The program aims to characterize the role of genes in patient susceptibility to Parkinson's disease risk, as well as disease progression and response to drug treatment. Areas of interest include the assessment of gene mutations such as that in the Parkin gene, the gathering of data obtained across different ethnic studies and the assessment of genotypes from family studies.

• Trillium Therapeutics Inc., of Toronto, and Medarex Inc., of Princeton, N.J., formed a collaboration to develop fully human antibody therapeutics. Medarex plans to use its UltiMAb Human Antibody Development System to generate antibodies to disease targets identified by Trillium. The companies will share equally the cost and responsibility of the development. They also will jointly commercialize and share future revenues from products.

• United Therapeutics Corp., of Silver Spring, Md., said data reported at the European Respiratory Society meeting in Vienna, Austria, described the use of rapid dosing strategies of Remodulin and its long-term efficacy. Findings from a cohort of 19 patients treated with Remodulin over about 16 months showed that they experienced significant reductions in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Cardiac index also improved significantly, the company said. Furthermore, the mean six-minute walk distance increased by 121 meters from baseline and the average New York Heart Association classification improved from 3.2 to 2.4.

• VizX Labs LLC, of Seattle, said GeneSifter.Net Version 2003.4 has the added qualities of two mechanisms to search, filter and group genes. It also has built-in clustering capabilities, including partitioning using the partitioning around medoids technique and hierarchical sample clustering from gene lists.

• XOMA Ltd., of Berkeley, Calif., and Children's Medical Center Dallas began an open-label, single-center Phase I/II trial of Neuprex in children with congenital heart abnormalities requiring open-heart surgery associated with cardiopulmonary bypass. Neuprex is an injectable form of a modified recombinant fragment of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

• ZymoGenetics Inc., of Seattle, entered a commercial manufacturing agreement with Abbott Laboratories, of Abbott Park, Ill., for the production of recombinant human Thrombin as an alternative to bovine plasma-derived thrombin to control bleeding in surgical and wound-healing settings. Abbott will be responsible for the production of rhThrombin for use by ZymoGenetics in late-stage clinical studies and commercial sale. ZymoGenetics retains all commercial rights. Financial terms were not disclosed.