• Amersham Biosciences, of Piscataway, N.J., the life sciences business of Amersham plc, introduced an addition to its CodeLink System. CodeLink UniSet Human 20K I Bioarray enables researchers to assay nearly 20,000 human genes in a single experiment using just one bioarray, it said.

• Computer Sciences Corp., of El Segundo, Calif., said DynPort Vaccine Co. LLC, a joint venture between CSC and Porton International, of London, completed Phase I testing of the safety and immunogenicity of an improved cell-cultured smallpox vaccine (CCSV). In the trial, 100 percent of 350 volunteers exhibited a positive response to either the CCSV or the historic calf lymph-produced smallpox vaccine. However, the incidence of vaccine-related fatigue, application site rash, increased temperature, headache, lymphangitis and nausea was at least 8 percent less common for volunteers receiving CCSV than Dryvax, it said.

• GlycoDesign Inc., of Toronto, said it restructured operations in advance of the proposed acquisition of GlycoDesign by Inflazyme Pharmaceuticals Ltd., of Vancouver, British Columbia, eliminating 19 positions. The restructuring concentrates GlycoDesign's scientific efforts and minimizes overhead costs in advance of the proposed acquisition. The company will retain a core scientific and management group in support of its Core 2 anti-inflammatory program, as well as continuing to advance its GH9001 and ATH programs undertaken through the Henderson Research Center. GlycoDesign and Inflazyme are merging in a C$12.8 million transaction. (See BioWorld Today, April 10, 2003.)

• InterMune Inc., of Brisbane, Calif., said its request to dismiss Patients Fighting Pulmonary Fibrosis founder Joe Stendig's complaint against the company was denied by the San Francisco Superior Court. Stendig's lawsuit alleges that InterMune unlawfully suppressed a life-saving drug, pirfenidone, in order to protect its Actimmune market from competition. Stendig also charged that InterMune unreasonably withheld pirfenidone from dying patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, even though the FDA permits access to such drugs for critically ill patients. Stendig is seeking an injunction and punitive damages.

• Martek Biosciences Corp., of Columbia, Md., said it priced its public offering of 2.5 million shares of common stock at $30.25 per share. The stock is expected to be issued on April 22, subject to customary conditions. Martek's retired president, Richard Radmer, is also selling 315,000 shares under the offering. Martek expects to receive net proceeds of about $71 million from the sale. Martek develops, manufactures and sells products from microalgae.

• Northwest Biotherapeutics Inc., of Bothell, Wash., received notification from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., that it will receive a two-year National Cancer Institute grant providing $645,000 for cancer research support. The company is focused on immunotherapy products that generate and enhance immune system responses to treat cancer.

• Oxford GlycoSciences plc, of Oxford, UK, made changes to its board reflecting the new controlling interest in the company held by Celltech Group plc, of Slough, UK. Three members resigned, including Raymond Dwek, Max Burger and Donald Drakeman, while six new members were named nonexecutive directors. The new group includes Peter Allen, a Celltech director, John Slater, Peter Nicholls, Ian Nicholson, Jonathan Glenn and Andrew Weir. Celltech emerged as the successful purchaser of Oxford GlycoSciences for US$173 million after other interested parties had dropped from the bidding. (See BioWorld Today, April 14, 2003.)

• PPD Inc., of Wilmington, N.C., made an equity investment in Chemokine Therapeutics Corp., of Vancouver, British Columbia, to continue development of a peptide derived from a particular chemokine that may make the peptide useful as a blood recovery therapeutic agent. Privately held Chemokine granted PPD an exclusive option to license the peptide following completion of Phase I studies. Chemokine also granted PPD the right to first negotiate a license to other Chemokine compounds. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Symyx Technologies Inc., of Santa Clara, Calif., entered agreements with Merck & Co. Inc., of Whitehouse Station, N.J., for the development, purchase and license of a Discovery Tools Process Optimization Workflow for preclinical development use.

• Transkaryotic Therapies Inc., of Cambridge, Mass., said its board was named a defendant in a purported shareholder derivative lawsuit filed in the Superior Court of Middlesex County in Cambridge. TKT, which called many of the allegations somewhat similar to allegations asserted in a previous class-action lawsuit against the company, said the complaint alleges that board members breached their fiduciary duties to the company, and seeks unspecified damages and injunctive relief.

• Valentis Inc., of Burlingame, Calif., received notification from Nasdaq that its common stock will continue to be listed on The Nasdaq SmallCap Market via an exception from the independent director and audit committee composition requirements of Nasdaq Marketplace Rules. The Nasdaq panel decided that one of the company's directors is not independent because his previous employer became an affiliate of the company within three years of the director leaving his position with that employer. Valentis said it believes the issue can be resolved.