* Cell Pathways Inc., of Horsham, Pa., adopted a stockholder rights plan. The plan was not adopted in response to any effort to acquire control of the company.

* IntraBiotics Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Mountain View, Calif., received a $1 million milestone payment from Parmacia & Upjohn, of Bridgewater, N.J., for completing a Phase I study of Protegrin IB-367, a potential new treatment for oral mucositis. IB-367 is a synthetic analog of the protegrin family of mammalian antimicrobial peptides.

* Maxim Pharmaceuticals Inc., of San Diego, disclosed updated results from an ongoing Phase II trial of Maxamine in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. The data suggest encouraging increases in leukemia-free survival. The strength of the data led the company to begin a clinical Phase III trial of Maxamine as a remission therapy for AML patients. (See BioWorld Today, Feb. 20, 1998, p. 1.)

* MedImmune Inc., of Gaithersburg, Md., and Pasteur Merieux Connaught, of Lyon, France, entered into a license agreement to develop a second-generation vaccine for the prevention of Lyme disease. The first-generation candidate by Connaught, based on a protein known as outer surface protein A, has completed a Phase III clinical trial. Connaught has gained exclusive worldwide rights to MedImmune's technology related to a protein known as decorin binding protein, which is also found on the organism that causes Lyme disease. Financial terms of the licensing deal were not disclosed.

* SafeScience Inc., of Boston, acquired the intellectual property of PhytoPharmaceuticals Inc., of Champagne, Ill. The acquisition includes all rights to PhytoPharmaceuticals' products based on carbohydrate chemistry, screening tools and compound optimization technologies. Financial terms were not disclosed.

* Schering-Plough Corp., of Madison, N.J., submitted a new drug application to the FDA to market mometasone furoate inhalation powder for the maintenance treatment of asthma in adults and adolescents 12 years and older. Mometasone furoate is an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid. In some countries, the inhalation powder will be known as Asmanex.

* Transkaryotic Therapies Inc., of Cambridge, Mass., started a Phase I safety study evaluating a gene therapy treatment for hemophilia. Transkaryotic's non-viral gene therapy technology, known as Transkaryotic therapy, is based on genetically modifying a patient's cells to produce and deliver therapeutic proteins for an extended period of time. The study, which should take three years to complete - including a two-year follow-up period following treatment - will be conducted at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center with 12 patients. In addition, Transkaryotic extended an existing licensing agreement with PolyMasc Pharmaceuticals plc, of London, to allow for the development of a second PEGylated protein pharmaceutical. This action triggers unspecified licensing and technology transfer payments to PolyMasc.

* Trega Biosciences Inc., of San Diego, said Warner-Lambert Co., of Morris Plains, N.J., agreed to purchase through its Parke-Davis division $1.5 million of Trega's combinatorial libraries on a nonexclusive basis before the end of the year. The new agreement supersedes a prior deal made in May 1997.

* Vimrx Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Wilmington, Del., said a cooperative research and development agreement was partly funded by its Nexell Therapeutics Inc. division to study CD34 cells. In the study, researchers showed that using genetically corrected CD34 stem cells in some patients with chronic granulomatous disease resulted in continuous production of functionally normal white blood cells safely for more than six months.

* Xcyte Therapies Inc., of Seattle, presented preliminary data from a Phase I trial showing its Xcellerate process achieved what appears to be complete remission of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in six of eight patients in a Phase I clinical trial. Five are alive an average of more than 10 months after the therapy. Xcellerate is a process in which T cells are extracted from blood, co-stimulated in the laboratory with a particular combination of antibodies, and then returned to the body to kill cancer cells.

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