* Amarillo Biosciences Inc., of Amarillo, Texas, received notices of allowance on two patents licensed from Texas A&M University, of College Station. The patents are titled "Treatment of viral disease with oral interferon alpha," and "Treatment of neoplasatic disease with oral interferon."

* American Biogenetic Sciences Inc., of Copiague, N.Y., received patent No. 5,721,122, titled "Method comprising immunization of antigen-free mice," covering a method of obtaining primed lymphocytes which produce highly specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

* Antigenics LLC, of New York, received patent No. 5,750,119, titled "Immunotherapeutic stress protein-peptide complexes against cancer," which covers the company's heat shock protein (HSP) technology. The patent covers Antigenics' approach to cancer treatment using HSP-antigen complexes that come from the patient's tumor as well as HSP-antigen complexes that are derived from non-autologous tissue sources. The resulting vaccines stimulate a cellular immune response against primary tumor cells as well as metastases, which remain after surgery.

* Cadus Pharmaceutical Corp., of Tarrytown, N.Y., said the National Jewish Medical Research Center, in Denver, received patent No. 5,753,446 for assays identifying compounds that regulate signal transduction by MAPK/ERK Kinase Kinases (MEKK1, MEKK2, MEKK3 or MEKK4). Cadus is the exclusive licensee of this patent. The MEKK enzymes are part of the inflammatory signaling pathway in human white blood cells and may be useful drug targets for asthma, allergic inflammation, autoimmune diseases and anti-viral therapy.

* Caliper Technologies Corp., of Palo Alto, Calif., said notices of allowance were issued for five patent applications for broad claims directed to fundamental elements of microfluidic technology.

* Cell Genesys Inc., of Foster City, Calif. was issued a broad patent (No. 5,753,500) covering all gene therapy products that use adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to deliver genes as therapeutic agents. AAV vectors have the ability to deliver genes effectively to several types of tissue, including muscle, liver, nerve and cardiovascular tissues.

* Cortex Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Irvine, Calif., received two patents covering Ampakines, a new pharmaceutical class. Ampakines work by increasing the effect of glutamate on the AMPA neuroreceptor. The patents were: No. 5,736,543, titled "Benzoxazines for enhancing synaptic response"; and No. 5,747,492, titled "Heteroatom substituted benzoly derivatives that enhance synaptic responses mediated by AMPA receptors".

* Cytel Corp., of San Diego, received patent No. 5,728,554 for an improved carbohydrate synthesis method based on its proprietary sugar nucleotide cycling technology. The patent covers a novel method of controlling enzymatic reactions, resulting in increased yields of specialized carbohydrates approaching 100 percent. Specifically, the patent covers the enzymatic synthesis of oligosaccharides (complex carbohydrates) using specialized recombinant enzymes called glycosyltransferases. These enzymes can form the appropriate chemical linkages necessary in creating tailor-made carbohydrate products.

* Genta Inc., of San Diego, received a patent for its lead antisense compound, G3139, which is under development for a potential anticancer therapeutic. As an antisense compound, G3139 is designed to act toward a specific gene and prevent it from triggering the production of a disease-related protein. G3139's target, the bcl-2 gene, interferes in the normal mortality of cells and has been implicated in prostate cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, melanoma, and breast and other cancers.

* ICAgen Inc., of Research Triangle Park, N.C., received four patents, Nos. 5,742,278; 5,734,021; 5,728,535; and 5,744,324 for its potassium ion channel technology. The broad patents titled, "Inward rectifier, G-protein activated, mammalian potassium KGA channels," cover nucleic acids, degenerative sequences, amino acids comprising the gene products, host cells expression systems, homomultimers and heteromultimers of the Kir3 gene family, and all uses of those molecular ion channel targets.

* Idec Pharmaceuticals Corp., of San Diego, received four notices of allowance for three U.S. patents. The first is aimed at methods of radioimmunotherapy of B-cell lymphoma combining the company's approved agent, Rituxan, with the investigational radiolabeled agent, IDEC-Y2B8. The other two patents are directed to methods of using anti-gp39 (also known as CD40 ligand) antibodies to treat multiple sclerosis, to induce T cell non-responsiveness in the bone marrow transplant setting and to inhibit graft-vs.-host disease. IDEC-Y2B8 radioimmunotherapy is being developed as a complementary product to Rituxan for the treatment of B-cell lymphoma.

* Immunomedics Inc., of Morris Plains, N.J., received two patents on multiple claims to methods for detecting or treating cancers and infectious and cardiovascular lesions by delivering imaging or therapeutic agents with targeting antibodies, fragments or peptides.

* Integra LifeSciences Corp., of Plainsboro, N.J., received a patent based on the peptide sequence arginine-glycine-aspartic acid that was recently issued to the Burnham Institute and is exclusively licensed to Integra through its San Diego subsidiary, Telios Pharmaceuticals Inc.

* Introgen Therapeutics Inc., of Austin, Texas, said the University of Texas at Austin received patent No. 5,747,469, titled "Methods and compositions comprising DNA damaging agents and p53." The patent covers gene therapy using a p53 tumor suppressor gene in combination with one or more chemotherapeutic drugs, radiation therapies or other agents that have a damaging effect on the DNA of cancer cells. The patent is one of several intellectual properties owned by the university and licensed exclusively to Introgen.

* Milkhaus Laboratory, of Boxford, Mass. received a patent for its product, S03, for the treatment of scars. SO3, given orally, acts systemically to reduce both recent scars and those present for years. The company plans to submit an investigational new drug application to initiate clinical trials later this year.

* Myriad Genetics Inc., of Salt Lake City, received patent No. 5,747,282 titled "17-Q linked breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene." The patent is a composition of matter patent covering the BRCA1 gene, any fragments of the BRCA1 gene and primers for the BRCA1 gene. It also covers the expression constructs and transformed host cells which could be used in gene therapy and as a screen for cancer therapeutics. BRCA1 is a gene linked to breast and ovarian cancer.

* Neoprobe Corp., of Dublin, Ohio, received notice of allowance for a broad patent covering the company's RIGS/ACT technology for cancer. The 48 patent claims cover the entire RIGS/ACT process, from finding lymph nodes enriched with tumor reactive cells in a cancer patient, to infusing the expanded, activated cells into the same patient in an attempt to jump-start an immune response to the disease.

* Neuralstem Biopharmaceuticals Ltd., of College Park, Md., received patent No. 5,753,506, protecting the company's CNS stem cell technology, a cell-based genetic therapy and drug discovery technology aimed at disorders of the central nervous system (CNS).

* Neurobiological Technologies Inc. (NTI), of Richmond, Calif., received a notice of allowance for a patent titled, "Pharmaceutical formulation of corticotropin-releasing factor [CRF] having improved stability in liquid form." CRF is the active ingredient in NTI's Xerecept preparation, currently being evaluated for treatment of peritumoral brain edema in a Phase II trial.

* Neuromedica Inc., of Conshohocken, Pa., received a notice of allowance for the use of Taxoprexin, which is being developed for cancer chemotherapy. It is made by linking paclitaxel to a natural fatty acid, docosabexaenoic acid (DHA). Taxoprexin was designed to selectively increase the proportion of cytotoxic compound that is delivered to a cancer cell while reducing the proportion of drug absorbed by normal cells.

* Progenitor Inc., of Menlo Park, Calif., received patent No. 5,744,347, relating to isolation, culture and compositions of stem cells capable of developing into blood, immune or blood vessel cells. These stem cells may have potential therapeutic uses in bone marrow transplantation, as vascular graft and coatings, and as cell-based gene therapy vectors for blood and immune disorders.

* Soane BioSciences Inc., of Hayward, Calif., received patent No. 5,750,015, which includes 47 claims providing broad coverage encompassing microfluidics technology. The patent covers methods and devices employing electric field driven movement of molecules, cells, particles and bulk liquids through interconnected microcapillaries formed on the surface of glass and plastic chips. Microfluidic methods enable complex laboratory protocols to be one on microchips.

* T Cell Sciences Inc., of Needham, Mass., (now Avant Immunotherapeutics Inc.) received patent No. 5,747,265 for its Paperdot system, which collects blood samples on filter paper and then measures the amount of cell-associated molecules present. The patent covers the measurement of certain cell markers (including CD4 and CD8) found on white blood cells in human blood samples.

* Targeted Genetics Corp., of Seattle, received patent No. 5,747,292, covering chimeric cytokine receptors that may be used to enhance the efficacy of lymphocytes in adoptive immunotherapy. Lymphocytes transduced with the chimeric cytokine receptors may be successful in treating infectious diseases and cancer. The patent was titled "Chimeric Cytokine Receptors in Lymphocytes."

* Visible Genetics Inc., of Toronto, received a notice of allowance for a patent titled "Method for evaluation of polymorphic genetic sequences and the use thereof in identification of HLA types." The patent describes a single track sequencing technology used to identify or genotype a known gene by sequencing less than all four DNA bases. The patent describes several methods for the identification of a genotype using only one DNA code and shows that it can identify the allelic type in HLA as well as determine the genotype of many infectious viruses.

* Xoma Corp., of Berkeley, Calif., received two patents expanding the company's protected medical applications for products developed from BPI, a human host-defense protein that is a natural weapon against infection and represents Xoma's core drug development platform. Patent No. 5,753,620 protects methods of treating humans exposed to bacterial endotoxin in the bloodstream by administering BPI protein products. Patent No. 5,736,464 specifically relates to methods of treating humans suffering from hemorrhage due to trauma.