* Gene Logic Inc., of Columbia, Md., received patent No. 5,712,126, which covers the company's READS gene expression technology. READS (restriction enzyme analysis of differentially-expressed sequences) allows for the ability to analyze how genes are used in human tissues.

* Genelabs Technologies Inc., of Redwood City, Calif., was issued patent No. 5,716,780, titled "Method of Constructing Sequence Specific DNA-Binding Molecules." The patent is for constructing linear polymer non-oligonucleotide, non-peptide DNA-binding agents of at least two small molecule subunits.

* GenVec Inc., of Rockville, Md., received patent No. 5,658,724, covering the genetic modification of herpes simplex virus (HSV). The patent pertains to newly developed, replication deficient HSV vectors with reduced toxicity. The patent also claims cell lines for the manufacture of these vectors.

* ICAgen Inc., of Research Triangle, N.C., received two patents, Nos. 5,492,825 and 5,670,335, for potassium ion channel technology. The patents cover nucleic acids, degenerative sequences, amino acids comprising the gene products, host cell expression systems and potassium channels. The therapeutic applications include the central nervous system, heart and neuroendocrine organs.

* Idec Pharmaceuticals Inc., of San Diego, received seven patents. Five of them cover human monoclonal antibodies against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), cell lines expressing such antibodies and such antibodies' use in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of RSV. Another patent involved the homologous recombination system for high-level protein expression in mammalian cells, and the final patent was for the company's humanized anti-gp39 antibody, IDEC-131, which this month entered Phase I trials for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

* IDM, of Paris, received patent No. 5,662,899 for technology that provides macrophages with longer-lasting and more efficient antitumor capabilities, both in a natural and activated state.

* Idun Pharmaceuticals Inc., of La Jolla, Calif., received three patents covering Bax, an apoptotic gene that may be a candidate for inducing programmed cell death in some cancers. The patents, Nos. 5,691,179, 5,700,638 and 5,702,897, also cover the methods of screening for agents that modulate apoptosis, or cell death. The patents are licensed exclusively from Washington University, of St. Louis, and the Burnham Institute, of La Jolla, Calif.

* Immunex Corp., of Seattle, received a patent for soluble fusion proteins and methods of making them that includes its soluble CD40 ligand product. The patent covers a proprietary "engineering" approach for binding together multiple copies of the same protein used in CD40 ligand. Phase I safety trials will begin this year.

* Immunomedics Inc., of Morris Plains, N.J., received a patent covering disease-seeking antibody technology that the company believes may completely change the detection methods and treatment of cancer, infection, clots and coronary heart diseases. Patent No. 5,716,595 covers the use of small, minimally radioactive disease-seeking antibody molecules that bind to a specific protein on the surface of diseased cells, bacteria or blood clots.

* Ixsys Inc., of San Diego, received a patent that covers combinatorial protein expression and peptide expression libraries used in the discovery and engineering of some proteins and polypeptides. The technology is used to discover and optimize antibodies and peptides. The patent, No. 5,723,323, involves the cloning, expression and screening of combinatorial gene libraries of diverse nucleic acid sequences to identify novel molecules.

* Meridian Diagnostics Inc., of Cincinnati, received a patent titled "Immunoassay for H. pylori in Fecal Specimens." Meridian's new premier platinum test detects the presence of specific antigens of the ulcer-causing Helicobacter pylori from stool specimens. The H. pylori bacterium is the leading cause of peptic ulcers and is linked to gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma.

* Metabasis Therapeutics Inc., of San Diego, received a patent for a key series of adenosine kinase inhibitors. Metabasis, a wholly owned subsidiary of Gensia Sicor Inc. of Irvine, Calif., said the patent helps protect two development compounds, GP3269 and GP 531.

* Milkhaus Laboratory Inc., of Boxford, Mass., received a patent on its investigational agent for the treatment of pulmonary diseases, particularly cystic fibrosis.

* Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Cambridge, Mass., received a patent titled "Compositions and Methods for the Treatment and Diagnosis of Immune Disorders." It covers genes and gene sequences that encode a TH1-specific cysteine protease for the discovery of new drugs for asthma and multiple sclerosis. Cysteine proteases are enzymes that control cell functions including cell death, degradation of intracellular proteins and peptide hormone activation.

* Molecumetics Ltd., of Seattle, received six patents expanding the company's SMART Library core chemistry technology. The patents (Nos. 5,618,914; 5,670,1555; 5,672,081; 5,674,976; 5,710,245, and 5,693,325) cover the composition and synthesis of proprietary small-molecule beta-and ganna-turns, beta-bulges, and alpha-helix templates as well as the use of certain templates as peptide vaccines.

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