* Aastrom Biosciences Inc., of Ann Arbor, Mich., recieved patent No. 5,688,687, covering its cell culture chamber for the ex vivo production of human cells, including stem cells.

* Advanced Bioconcept Ltd., of Monteal, received notices of allowance for two patents related to the company's flu-peptide fluorescent probe technology. The peptides have applications in high-throughput drug discovery and as substitutes for radiolabeled peptides.

* Alexion Pharmaceuticals Inc., of New Haven, Conn., has license to a recently issued patent owned by the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, of Oklahoma City, and Yale University, of New Haven, Conn. The issued patent, No. 5,705,732, covers transgenic animals expressing the human complement inhibitor CD59, which has applications in xenotransplantation. Alexion also received a notice of allowance for a patent related to the company's C5 inhibitor program, aimed at producing recombinant drugs designed to intervene in the inflammation-causing complement cascade. The program's lead compound, 5G1.1-SC, is designed to prevent the adverse effects of cardiopulmonary bypass.

* American Biogenetic Sciences Inc., of Copiague, N.Y., received patent No. 5,672,746, related to a class of small molecular weight organic molecules known as the ABS 200 series, in development for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

* Aphton Corp., of Woodland, Calif., received two patents: No. 5,688,506, related to Gonadimmune, an anti-gonadotropin-releasing hormone treatment for prostate, breast and endometrial cancers, and for endometriosis; and No. 5,622,702, relating to the company's anti-gastrin-17 product, Gastrimmune, for the therapeutic reduction of stomach acid in both humans and animals.

* ArQule Inc., of Medford, Mass., received patent No. 5,705,585, covering aminimide-containing molecules that can potentially serve as mimetics of peptides, nucleotides, polysaccharides and lipids. Under the patent, ArQule can design a new family of compounds capable of imitating the biological activity of major types of biological molecules.

* Arris Pharmaceutical Corp., of South San Francisco, received patent No. 5,693,515, covering methods useful in research for the discovery of protease inhibitors, for identifying structural activity relationships of protease inhibitors, for screening molecules against specific enzyme targets and for developing selective small molecule protease inhibitors.

* BioStar Inc., of Boulder, Colo., received three patents related to the firm's Optical ImmunoAssay Technology. No. 5,629,214 covers the production process and together with a new international patent is instrumental in the operation of an optical immunoassay for detection of a variety of analytes, including infectious disease. No. 5,631,171 describes an instrument for monitoring a semi-conductor process, and No. 5,639,671 describes a research tool for designing a sensitive color-contrast device that is useful in optimizing optical-based assays.

* Cambridge NeuroScience Inc., of Cambridge, Mass., received patent No. 5,681,568, covering a controlled-release delivery vehicle for large molecules. The technology could lead to transdermal patches or dissolving implants.

* Cell Genesys Inc., of Foster City, Calif., received patent No. 5,686,281, covering T cell receptor technologies which could potentially heighten a disease-specific immune response by enhancing T cell proliferation and by ensuring normal T cell function and survival.

* Celtrix Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Santa Clara, Calif., received patent No. 5,681,818, covering methods for treating osteoporosis and other medical conditions requiring stimulation of bone and tissue growth.

* Chromagen Inc., of San Diego, received a patent and notices of allowances covering highly fluorescent nucleotide analogues that allow direct labeling of DNA and RNA probes.

* Cytoclonal Pharmaceutics Inc., of Dallas, received patent No. 5,654,408, covering an antigen associated with malignant melanoma.

* DepoTech Corp., of San Diego, received a notice of allowance for a patent covering a method of prolonging drug release from liposomes, including the company's DepoFoam sustained-release drug-delivery system

* Dianon Systems Inc., of Stratford, Conn., received patent No. 5,698,402, covering a blood test designed to distinguish between patients with benign prostatic disease and prostate cancer. The test measures both total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and a non-complexed, or "free," form of PSA.

* Dyax Corp., of Cambridge, Mass., received a notice of allowance for a fourth patent covering phage display technology. The patent covers claims for displaying novel protein molecules, including antibodies, on a filamentous bacteriophage.

* Enzon Inc., of Piscataway, N.J., received six patents in the second half of 1997: No. 5,637,749, for aryl imidate activated polyalkalene oxides; No. 5,643,575, for non-antigenic branched polymer conjugates; No. 5,650,388, for fractionated polyalkylene oxide-conjugated hemoglobin solutions; No. 5,656,730, for stabilized monomeric protein compositions; No. 5,681,567, for a method of preparing polyalkylene oxide carboxylic acids; and No. 5,686,110, for water-soluble complex of an alkyl or olefinic endcapped polyalkalene oxide and a water insoluble substance.

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