BioWorld Today here continues its occasional listings of government agencies seeking industrial licensees to commercialize their biotechnology-related research and development inventions. Commercialization rights are offered by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Technology Transfer (OTT). Announcements of the following cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) partnership and licensing opportunities have been submitted recently to the Federal Register.

To obtain CRADA or licensing information, and copies of the U.S. patent issuances or applications listed below, contact the OTT licensing specialists indicated.

National Center For Research Resources

Heat-Inducible Gene Therapy

A heat-shock protein promoter used in combination with tissue heating by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided-focused ultrasound (FUS) gives localized spatial and temporal control of expression from introduced genes. This system overcomes the inability of current gene therapy protocols to simultaneously control the location and timing of therapeutic expression.

The NCRR seeks partners to evaluate the feasibility and safety of gene therapy products using this technology in animal models and humans. Of particular interest is the use of adenoviral vectors to express lymphokine genes for cancer therapy, immunomodulation and angiogenesis induction. There is no deadline by which license applications or CRADA proposals must be received.

Contacts:

For proposals: Tom Ingalls, (301) 496-6235

For licensing: Larry Tiffany, (301) 496-7735, ext. 206

FDA

Hepatitis A Virus Receptor

The African green monkey cellular receptor for hepatitis A virus cDNA is available for the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. Cells that are not normally infected by hepatitis A become susceptible when transfected with this cDNA. The receptors coded for by this cDNA could potentially neutralize the virus or aid in the development of receptor-binding antagonists and attenuated vaccines in transgenic animals.

Application: 08/287,001

Filed: 8/5/94

Inventors: Kaplan, G., et al.

Contact: George Keller, (301) 496-7735, ext. 246

National Cancer Institute

EGF Kinase Substrate As Myeloid Leukemia Marker

A substrate for epidermal growth factor (EGF) kinase, eps15, may serve as a tumor marker for myeloid leukemia. This substrate may also be useful in determining tyrosine kinase activity in a tissue sample as a method of studying signal transduction by EGF. In addition to eps15 cDNA, expression constructs, antibodies to eps15 and assay methods are available.

U.S. patent: 5,487,979

Filed: 6/7/95

Inventors: DiFiore, P.P., et al.

Contact: Susan Rucker, (301) 496-7056, ext. 245

T Cell Receptors That Bind Tumor Antigens

The genes and amino acid sequences of T cell receptors that recognize or bind a variety of tumor antigens are available for therapeutic development. These receptors and hematopoietic stem cells engineered to express them or receptor-antibody chimeras are useful for a variety of therapeutic approaches to cancer immunotherapy.

Application: 08/411,098

Filed: 3/27/95

Inventors: Hwu, P., et al.

Contact: Joseph Contrera, (301) 496-7056, ext. 244

Breast Cancer-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

Eleven monoclonal antibodies that recognize only human mammary tumor cells are potential diagnostic and therapeutic agents for breast cancer. These antibodies can be useful for the in situ detection of early microlesions as well as primary and metastatic cancers.

U.S. patent: 4,522,918

Filed: 6/11/85

Inventors: Schlom, J., et al.

Contact: Joseph Contrera, (301) 496-7056, ext. 244

Gag Pseudovirions For HIV Vaccination

Inoculation of pseudovirions containing HIV Gag and Gag-Env fusion proteins generated from chimeric genes cause mice to develop cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to both proteins and a strong humoral response to Gag. These proteins are potential candidates for a prophylactic vaccine and could be used to boost the immune response in HIV-infected individuals. Other non-viral proteins, such as interleukins and interferons, can be packaged in these pseudovirions.

OTT reference: E-105-96/0

Issued: 5/16/96

Inventors: Tobin, G.J., et al.

Contact: Cindy Fuchs, (301) 496-7735, ext. 232

Melanoma Antigens for Therapy

CD4+ T cells recognize MHC class II-restricted melanoma antigens, thus making these antigens potentially useful for inducing an immune response to this cancer. A number of melanoma antigens and their immunogenic peptides, as well as their coding sequences, are disclosed, as are methods for inducing immune responses to them.

Application: 08/533,895

Filed: 9/26/95

Inventors: Topalian, S.L., et al.

Contact: Joseph Contrera, (301) 496-7056, ext. 244

National Institute Of Allergy & Infectious Diseases

IL-2 Stimulated T Cell Apoptosis For Immunotherapy

Combination therapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and specific antigens induces the death of T cell subpopulations reacting with these antigens. Unlike other treatments that can cause general immunosuppression, this combination therapy leaves the remainder of the immune system intact. IL-2 therapy is particularly useful in treating allergies, HIV complications, and other immune system diseases.

Application: 08/482,724

Filed: 6/7/95

Inventors: Lenardo, M.J.

Contact: Jaconda Wagner, (301) 496-7735, ext. 284

IL-4 Stimulated T Cell Apoptosis for Immunotherapy

Combination therapy with interleukin-4 (IL-4) and specific antigens induces the death of T cell subpopulations reacting with these antigens. Unlike other treatments that can cause general immunosuppression, this combination therapy leaves the remainder of the immune system intact. IL-4 therapy is particularly useful in treating allergies, HIV complications, and other immune system diseases.

Application: 08/348,286

Filed: 11/30/94

Inventors: Lenardo, M.J., et al.

Contact: Jaconda Wagner, (301) 496-7735, ext. 284

--Compiled by Chester A. Bisbee

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