• Crucell NV, of Leiden, the Netherlands, licensed its PER.C6 cell production technology to the animal health division of Pfizer Inc., of New York, for use in the manufacture of a veterinary vaccine. The license is for research use, but may be converted into a commercial agreement. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

• Emergent BioSolutions Inc., of Rockville, Md., signed a license agreement with Coley Pharmaceutical Group Inc., of Wellesley, Mass., for the use of Coley's VaxImmune vaccine adjuvant compound in the development of anthrax vaccines. The deal allows the company to build on results of a Phase I study testing the safety and immunogencity of a combined product candidate using its BioThrax and Coley's VaxImmune. That trial was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. VaxImmune is a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist designed to induce both an enhanced antibody response and a killer T-cell immune response to infections. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

• Life Science Pharmaceuticals, of Greenwich, Conn., licensed KW-2871, a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the ganglioside antigen, GD3, from Tokyo-based Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co. Ltd. Financial terms were not disclosed. Preclinical and early clinical data have shown that KW-2871 creates an inflammatory response in melanoma, and LSP is collaborating with the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and the University of Pittsburgh Melanoma Center on a Phase II study of the product combined with immune system stimulators. Patient accrual and dosing is expected to begin in late second quarter or early third quarter.

• Scolr Pharma Inc., of Bellevue, Wash., said the consumer health care division of Wyeth, of Madison, N.J., is terminating its license to use Scolr's controlled delivery technology (CDT) in products containing ibuprofen. Scolr has received $2.1 million in milestone and other payments from Wyeth since the deal was signed in December 2005. Scolr now will reacquire all rights to use its technology in ibuprofen products and plans to continue development of its 12-hour extended-release ibuprofen.

• Shire plc, of Basingstoke, UK, kicked off its European launch of Dynepo (epoetin delta) in Germany. The anemia drug is the only erythropoiesis-stimulating agent produced in human cells rather than animal cells. Shire acquired the drug as part of a $1.6 billion cash buy-out of Transkaryotic Therapies Inc., although a U.S. launch was stymied after the court ruled that the drug infringed several patents held by Amgen Inc. relating to Epogen (epoetin alfa), including one patent that does not expire until 2015. (See BioWorld Today, Oct. 19, 2004 and Apr. 22, 2005.)

• VaxGen Inc., of Brisbane, Calif., filed an appeal regarding U.S. government's decision to terminate its $877.5 million anthrax vaccine contract under Project BioShield. The termination came after formulation issues and a clinical hold, and VaxGen has since restructured, reducing headcount by 51 percent to lower its burn. VaxGen said the appeal preserves the company's right to challenge the termination, even as discussions continue regarding a possible settlement. At issue is the fact that VaxGen invested approximately $175 million into its drug prior to the contract termination. (See BioWorld Today, Dec. 21, 2006.)