• Aclara BioSciences Inc., of Mountain View, Calif., said its senior vice president of eTag assay technology, Sharat Singh, will present today Aclara's progress in developing new applications for its eTag Assay system at the Drug Discovery Technology 2003 conference in Boston. The new applications include multiplexed biological assays for concurrent gene and protein expression performed on small sample amounts, including primary cells.

• Affymetrix Inc., of Santa Clara, Calif., and Ingenuity Systems, of Mountain View, Calif., formed a partnership to deliver the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis product to Affymetrix customers. The companies also said Affymetrix made an undisclosed equity investment in Ingenuity. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis is a web-based application designed to allow Affymetrix customers to discover, visualize and explore networks in gene expression array data sets.

• Agilent Technologies Inc., of Palo Alto, Calif., and Paradigm Genetics Inc., of Research Triangle Park, N.C., released a 60-mer oligonucleotide mouse microarray as part of a previously announced collaboration. It is designed for genome-wide profiling research to better understand adverse drug reactions, physiological effects of toxins and toxic substances, and to study genetic diseases such as cancer. On its own, Agilent released a product that simultaneously removes six high-abundance proteins from human blood serum. By using immunoaffinity technology to specifically target and remove those proteins, the liquid chromatography column allows researchers to identify more rare proteins that could serve as drug targets or biological markers in the detection of disease, it said.

• AgraQuest Inc., of Davis, Calif., submitted a registration application to the Environmental Protection Agency for the company's natural fumigant, Arabesque. Arabesque might be able to replace methyl bromide, a pre-plant soil fumigant, eradicating food-borne pathogens like Salmonella, E. coli and Listeria, controlling post-harvest molds that infest a wide variety of crops, and combating the molds that cause "sick building syndrome," AgraQuest said. Arabesque is based on a the microorganism Muscodor albus, which produces gaseous substances that fight plant and human pathogens.

• AVI BioPharma Inc., of Portland, Ore., amended the terms of its offer to exchange shares of common stock of AVI for shares of common stock and preferred stock of eXegenics Inc., as announced July 25, and extended the exchange offer to Aug. 29. AVI, through a wholly owned subsidiary, is offering to exchange 0.123 of a share of AVI common stock for each share of eXegenics common stock, and 0.185 of a share of AVI common stock for each share of eXegenics preferred stock. The exchange ratios represent an increase of about 20 percent over the corresponding exchange ratios previously announced. (See BioWorld Today, July 17, 2003.)

• Axon Instruments Inc., of Union City, Calif., said Neurion Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Pasadena, Calif., is using Axon's OpusXpress 6000A ion channel screening platform to enhance throughput in its drug discovery programs. Neurion Pharmaceuticals is a central nervous system drug discovery company targeting ion channels that have been implicated in neurological diseases such as anxiety, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

• BioTrove Inc., of Woburn, Mass., introduced its Momentum technology, an ultra-high-throughput mass spectrometry service designed to enable microliter-scale functional assay development and screening of intractable targets for which current technology is not an option. Through the Momentum Screening Service, BioTrove develops label-free assays and screens chemical libraries against biological targets. The technology was introduced at the Drug Discovery Technology 2003 conference in Boston.

• Caprion Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Montreal, entered a research collaboration with AstraZeneca plc, of London, to identify biomarkers for pain using Caprion's CellCarta proteomics discovery platform. Caprion will profile the proteomic changes occurring in plasma resulting from the administration of pharmaceutical compounds in relevant preclinical models. Terms were not disclosed.

• Cellomics Inc., of Pittsburgh, named Dan Calvo president and CEO. Formerly the vice president of worldwide sales and service at PerkinElmer Life Sciences in Boston, Calvo succeeds D. Lansing Taylor, who will remain chairman. At the same time, Cellomics entered a North American and European sales agreement to market its G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) Signaling BioApplication with Transfluor technology belonging to Norak Biosciences Inc., of Research Triangle Park, N.C. The Transfluor technology also will be marketed with Cellomics' ArrayScan High Content Screening (HCS) Reader and/or KineticScan HCS Reader, a wide portfolio of BioApplication software modules and HitKit HCS Reagent Kits, and informatics products. The parties also agreed to co-develop future GPCR-based reagent products. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Generex Biotechnology Corp., of Toronto, completed the acquisition of all of the issued and outstanding shares of Antigen Express Inc., of Worcester, Mass., in exchange for about 2.9 million shares of Generex common stock. Antigen Express will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary of Generex focused on the development of immunomedicines for the treatment of malignant, infectious, autoimmune and allergic diseases. The company's potential products are based on two platform technologies, Ii-Key hybrid peptides and Ii-Suppression, discovered by Robert Humphreys, the founder of Antigen Express. Generex's stock (NASDAQ:GNBT) gained 36 cents Monday, or 29.3 percent, to close at $1.59.

• GeneXP Biosciences Inc., of Woburn, Mass., secured a two-stage $2 million financing from Ingalls & Snyder LLC, a private investment fund, to support the company's ramp-up of commercial operations. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed. GeneXP's sample-in, data-out system allows researchers to perform gene expression experiments in less time and at less cost than other methods, it said.

• Genome Therapeutics Corp., of Waltham, Mass., received a payment from Amgen Inc., of Thousand Oaks, Calif., for the completion of a milestone under their agreement around using genetic information to discover and commercialize therapeutics for bone diseases, including osteoporosis. Amgen will make an equity investment in Genome Therapeutics at a premium to market price. Amgen potentially will make other equity investments in Genome Therapeutics, but the total investment will not exceed 4.99 percent. Genome Therapeutics' stock (NASDAQ:GENE) rose 62 cents Monday, or 23.9 percent, to close at $3.22. (See BioWorld Today, Jan. 3, 2003.)

• Guava Technologies Inc., of Hayward, Calif., introduced at the Drug Discovery Technology meeting in Boston the Guava PCA-96 AFP (Auto-Fluorescing Protein) system, which allows researchers to determine the relative levels of fluorescing proteins produced by individual cells in a culture and to screen 96 such cultures in a single instrument run. Separately, it said it introduced the Guava ViaCount RCS assay, designed to automatically identify populations of live and dead cells, while ignoring any debris present in the sample, without user intervention.

• Hemispherx Biopharma Inc., of Philadelphia, entered an agreement to allow two of its compounds to be tested against SARS and cancer by the Institute for Medical Virology at Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Hospital in Germany. The studies will evaluate the antiviral activity of Ampligen, a Phase III immunotherapeutic, and Alferon, an FDA-approved, natural, high-purity alph-interferon, alone and in combination against the severe acute respiratory syndrome virus. Hemispherx said the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., endorsed Ampligen's therapeutic activity against human coronavirus OC-43. Both compounds' anticancer activity also will be tested - the institute said interferon-alpha in combination with Valproic yields strong synergistic effects against brain tumors, and it also plans to compare the effects of Ampligen in antitumor assays.

• Hollis-Eden Pharmaceuticals Inc., of San Diego, converted all of its remaining outstanding debentures into about 1.7 million shares of common stock, including accrued interest. The $10 million original aggregate principal amount of 7.5 percent convertible debentures was sold in a private placement in February and had a maturity date of February 2006. Hollis-Eden became entitled to convert the debentures into common stock as of the close of market on Aug. 8, at which point the volume-weighted average price of Hollis-Eden's common stock had exceeded $14.25 for 15 consecutive trading days. The conversion of the debentures prior to the maturity date will result in a noncash charge to earnings in the quarter ended Sept. 30.

• IGI Inc., of Buena, N.J., said researchers at Boston University Medical Center reported in this month's issue of the British Journal of Dermatology the first successful development of a topical peptide drug for psoriasis. The parathyroid hormone analogue PTH (1-34) was encapsulated in Novasome A cream, which IGI said enhanced the absorption of the peptide drug into human skin. More specifically, findings showed that there was a 67.3 percent improvement in the global severity score for the lesion treated with Novasome A cream containing PTH (1-34) compared to the placebo-treated lesion, which showed only a 17.8 percent improvement.

• Immtech International Inc., of Vernon Hills, Ill., said data were published in last month's issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy showing that five of its compounds were efficacious in inhibiting propagation of bovine diarrhea virus, an RNA flavivirus genus commonly found in cows that is similar to both hepatitis C virus and the virus that causes West Nile infections. Immtech said such activity positions the compounds for advanced testing against the hepatitis C virus.

• Introgen Therapeutics Inc., of Austin, Texas, filed to sell up to $100 million worth of its common stock from time to time. Unless otherwise indicated in the prospectus supplement, net proceeds would be used for general corporate purposes and working capital requirements. It also might use a portion of the proceeds to fund possible investments in and acquisitions of complimentary businesses, partnerships, minority investments, products or technologies, it said. Introgen develops biopharmaceutical products using non-integrating gene agents designed to induce therapeutic protein expression for the treatment of cancer and other diseases.

• LifeCell Corp., of Branchburg, N.J., said it could raise $14 million after entering definitive purchase agreements for the private placement of about 3.3 million common shares at $4.25 apiece. The company said it might issue up to an additional 400,000 shares on the same terms if certain holders of its Series B preferred stock exercise their right to participate. LifeCell said it would use net proceeds from the financing, which it expects to close this week, to continue product development programs, expand sales and marketing and for potential acquisitions of complementary technologies or products. Its tissue processing methods produce a regenerative tissue matrix, a 3-dimensional structure that contains proteins, growth factors and vascular channels, which provides a template for the regeneration of normal human tissue. Wells Fargo Securities LLC and Roth Capital Partners LLC are the transaction's placement agents.

• NaPro BioTherapeutics Inc., of Boulder Colo., filed a shelf registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission to permit the company, from time to time, to offer and sell up to 6.5 million shares of NaPro common stock and 1 million shares of NaPro preferred stock. NaPro is focused on the development and in-licensing of anticancer agents and the development of genomics therapies. Its stock (NASDAQ:NPRO) fell 9 cents Monday to close at $1.13.

• Protedyne Corp., of Windsor, Conn., displayed its new Satellite Module at the Drug Discovery Technology 2003 conference that continues through Wednesday in Boston. The module, which will be sold in conjunction with the Molecular BioCube System, expands the system's capacity to integrate with incubators, detectors, plate washers, thermocyclers and other robotically compatible third-party peripherals.

• QLT Inc., of Vancouver, British Columbia, said it will offer $150 million of convertible senior notes due 2023. QLT also expects to grant the initial purchasers an option to purchase up to an additional $22.5 million aggregate principal amount of notes. The notes will be convertible under certain circumstances into QLT's common shares at the option of the holder at a determined price. QLT intends to use the proceeds for working capital and other general corporate purposes, including potential acquisitions or investment in businesses, products or technologies. Also, QLT intends to use a portion of the net proceeds to repurchase $50 million of QLT common shares on the open market. The Toronto Stock Exchange accepted notice of the intent to buy shares, QLT said.

• Seattle Genetics Inc., of Bothell, Wash., reported the publication of preclinical data on its SGN-35 product candidate, an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), in the Aug. 15, 2003, issue of Blood. The research illustrates that SGN-35 is highly efficacious at low doses and is capable of selectively targeting CD30-positive malignancies in models of Hodgkin's disease and certain types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. SGN-35 is an ADC composed of an anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody linked to a derivative of the cell-killing drug Auristatin E.

• Spectral Genomics Inc., of Houston, appointed Ed Chait CEO. Prior to joining Spectral, Chait was CEO of PharmaCore Inc., of High Point, N.C. Chait began his career at DuPont, where he held positions in research and development and sales and marketing. Spectral Genomics develops products and services related to molecular genetics and diagnostics enabling the identification of causal factors.

• SuperGen Inc., of Dublin, Calif., said a class-action complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, alleging violations of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and seeking unspecified damages, was voluntarily dismissed without prejudice by the plaintiffs. The suit related to the company's Mitozytrex, or MitoExtra, and its ability to treat cancer.

• Targeted Genetics Corp., of Seattle, filed to sell up to 11.6 million shares of common stock from time to time. It said it planned to use any funds raised for general corporate purposes, working capital and possible acquisitions of other businesses and technologies. Targeted Genetics has gene therapy products and technologies for treating both acquired and inherited diseases.

• Tripos Inc., of St. Louis, released the ChemCoreRIO, ChemCoreREG and the Tripos Electronic Notebook, the key components in its informatics solution designed to streamline laboratory work flow, and SARNavigator and LITHIUM, the data analysis and decision support components in its knowledge management solution. ChemCoreRIO is a registration, inventory and ordering system for chemical and biological data.

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