• Accelrys Inc., of San Diego, a wholly owned subsidiary of Pharmacopeia Inc., said its newest applications for the Discovery Studio family of products is slated for commercial release in the fall. DS Modeling 1.1 is designed for in silico modeling and simulation research.

• Aclara BioSciences Inc., of Mountain View, Calif., entered an agreement to provide its eTag Assay System to GlaxoSmithKline plc, of London, which will access the technology for use in its biopharmaceutical research and development activities. Aclara said GlaxoSmithKline also would use eTag assay reagent products and software for multiplexed gene expression profiling studies. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Agencourt Bioscience Corp., of Beverly, Mass., expanded its services to include a suite of cDNA and BAC library construction services. Agencourt now offers six library construction services, including standard and large insert cDNA libraries, normalized and subtracted cDNA libraries, BAC libraries and whole-genome shotgun libraries in a variety of vectors.

• BioSpecifics Technologies Corp., of Lynbrook, N.Y., said the FDA approved renovations to the manufacturing facility, utility systems and process equipment in Curacao, the Netherlands Antilles, as a supplement to its biologics license application for Collagenase, a wound healing product.

• Biotech Holdings Ltd., of Vancouver, British Columbia, received from its licensee in Mexico written confirmation on the approval of Sucanon, Biotech's Type II diabetes drug. Sucanon also is known as a Diab II in Peru and China where it has been approved. Sucanon is an insulin receptor sensitizer.

• Cambridge Antibody Technology Group plc, of Cambridge, UK, registered to sell up to $175 million in common stock or American depository shares from time to time. It said it would use any funds raised for general corporate purposes. The company's platform technology is designed to isolate human monoclonal antibodies using phage display systems.

• Corautus Genetics Inc., of San Diego, said it would gain $25 million after entering a collaboration with Boston Scientific Corp., of Natick, Mass., to develop and commercialize a gene therapy technology to treat cardiovascular disease, focusing initially on severe ischemic heart disease patients who have been unresponsive to conventional therapies. Boston Scientific paid a $1 million license fee for certain intellectual property, made a $9 million investment in exchange for 10 percent of Corautus' equity on a fully diluted basis, and committed to purchasing up to $15 million of convertible debt from Corautus based on achievement of certain milestones. Boston Scientific gained exclusive rights to distribute Corautus' vascular endothelial growth Factor II gene products upon regulatory approval. Corautus said it would begin clinical trials in the fourth quarter to test the efficacy of the VEGF-2 gene, which will be delivered with a Boston Scientific cardiac delivery catheter.

• Cryo-Cell International Inc., of Clearwater, Fla., appealed the delisting of its common stock by Nasdaq and requested that the stock be reinstated on the Nasdaq SmallCap Market. The delisting resulted from the company's failure to satisfy Nasdaq's $2.5 million minimum shareholders' equity requirement as of May 31. Cryo-Cell must submit its basis for appeal to the Nasdaq Listing and Hearing Review Council by Sept. 5. A decision is expected by the end of October, it said.

• Dendreon Corp., of Seattle, completed its acquisition of Corvas International Inc., of San Diego. Originally announced in February, the deal stipulates each share of Corvas stock will be exchanged for 0.45 shares of Dendreon stock in a tax-free reorganization. Based on Dendreon's closing share price of $6.38 Tuesday, the transaction is valued at $80.3 million. Dendreon's cash upon closing of the transaction is estimated at more than $130 million, it said. (See BioWorld Today, Feb. 26, 2003.)

• Entelos Inc., of Menlo Park, Calif., reported findings at the SRI Metabolic Disease Summit in San Diego related to a Type II diabetes compound belonging to Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development LLC, a unit of Johnson & Johnson, of New Brunswick, N.J. Using Entelos' Diabetes PhysioLab technology, the partners developed a dose-escalating Phase I study based on data and results from a series of trial simulations measuring human response to various doses of compound. Entelos said its research improved efficiency by reducing the experimental dosing arms and decreasing the number of patients required for the trial.

• Genta Inc., of Berkeley Heights, Calif., initiated a clinical trial with Genasense (oblimersen sodium) in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The Phase II study will evaluate Genasense in combination with Rituxan (rituximab, Genentech Inc. and IDEC Pharmaceuticals Inc.) and fludarabine. Although relapsed patients are eligible and will be separately analyzed, the trial represents the first use of Genasense in previously untreated patients with CLL using the new standard-of-care drug regimen. A randomized Phase III trial of Genasense in combination with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide completed enrollment earlier this year in patients with relapsed CLL.

• Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Baltimore, said initial purchasers of its convertible notes offering elected to buy $9.3 million in convertible subordinated notes to cover overallotments. That brings gross proceeds to $69.3 million. The notes are convertible into Guilford common stock at a price of $6.24 per share, which, if not converted, will mature on July 1, 2008. The notes bear an interest rate of 5 percent per year, payable semiannually. (See BioWorld Today, June 12, 2003.)

• Inveresk Research Group Inc., of Cary, N.C., acquired PharmaResearch Corp., of Morrisville, N.C., in an all-cash transaction valued at $37.1 million, net of cash acquired of about $10 million. PharmaResearch is focused on providing support services for Phase II-IV clinical trials, principally in the areas of respiratory and infectious diseases. Inveresk is a provider of drug development services to companies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

• Medivir AB, of Huddinge, Sweden, out-licensed MIV-150 to the Population Council in New York for use in a microbicide designed to prevent HIV transmission. The Population Council previously developed Carraguard, a vaginal microbicide now in clinical evaluation in African women to decrease HIV risk and prevent other sexually transmitted diseases. Medivir said the addition of MIV-150, a non-nucleoside HIV polymerase inhibitor previously out-licensed to Chiron Corp., of Emeryville, Calif., could increase the vaginal formulation's efficacy.

• Nektar Therapeutics, of San Carlos, Calif., said buyers exercised their option to purchase $10 million of 3 percent convertible subordinated notes as part of a purchase agreement from last month, increasing the principal amount of notes sold to $110 million. Due in 2010, the notes are convertible into Nektar common shares at about 88.1 shares per $1,000 principal amount, which is equivalent to an initial conversion price of $11.35 per share. Nektar said it repurchased $20.5 million of currently outstanding 3.5 percent convertible subordinated notes as part of privately negotiated transactions in exchange for about $16.2 million in cash. Nektar, previously Inhale Therapeutics Systems Inc., said it could use additional portions of the proceeds to repurchase additional outstanding debt, and to accelerate product development or make acquisitions. (See BioWorld Today, June 27, 2003.)

• NexMed Inc., of Robbinsville, N.J., entered an agreement for a $1.85 million line of credit with GE Life Science and Technology Finance, a unit of GE Commercial Finance, for the purchase of equipment for its manufacturing and laboratory facilities. NexMed's facility is expected to manufacture Alprox-TD, for erectile dysfunction, and other NexACT-based products under development.

• Oncolytics Biotech Inc., of Calgary, Alberta, entered a research collaboration with the Institut Catala d'Oncologia in Barcelona, Spain, to develop modified adenoviruses that are selective for Ras-mediated cancers. Oncolytics is focused on the development of Reolysin, its formulation for the human reovirus, as a potential cancer therapeutic.

• Pharsight Corp., of Mountain View, Calif., reached agreement in May with Silicon Valley Bank to extend its existing revolving line of credit for 12 months to May 27, 2004. Pharsight said it continues to have three credit facilities available: the balance of a $3.5 million term loan; a $1.4 million domestic accounts receivable revolving credit account and a $600,000 foreign accounts receivable revolving line of credit. As of June 30, the company had $1 million borrowed from its revolving credit facilities and a remaining secured term loan balance of $2.6 million.

• Progenics Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Tarrytown, N.Y., said in its second-quarter earnings that it has been awarded five grants totaling about $7.7 million from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. It was awarded three Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants, two of which are for cancer immunotherapies and one for hepatitis C viral entry inhibition. It also was granted two Phase II SBIR grants for development and production of entry inhibitors to the human immunodeficiency virus.

• Rodman & Renshaw Inc., of New York, said it purchased through an affiliate all the rights and assets related to the Techvest Healthcare Conferences from Techvest Partners LLC. The conference had 150 participating companies in 2002. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Structural GenomiX Inc., of San Diego, completed and deposited with the Protein Data Bank, a public database, the three-dimensional crystal structure of the main protease from the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome. The SARS main protease is believed to be the primary target for inhibitory antiviral agents. The company is exploring collaboration opportunities to develop a treatment for the virus.

• SuperGen Inc., of Dublin, Calif., said a Phase II study of Dacogen (decitabine) for injection in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), was published in the Aug. 1, 2003, issue of Cancer. The study enrolled 130 patients, 123 of whom had Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML. One hundred fifteen patients were in the blastic or accelerated phase. A median of three courses was required to reach the best objective and cytogenetic response. There was no significant difference in the response rates among dose levels in the accelerated and blastic phases patients, SuperGen said.

• The Immune Response Corp., of Carlsbad, Calif., exercised its option to redeem its remaining outstanding Class A warrants. It issued the warrants in its December private placement. Currently, there are about 2.4 million warrants outstanding, each exercisable for one share of common stock and one Class B warrant at an initial exercise price of $1.33. Also, each Class B warrant is exercisable for one share of stock at an initial exercise price of $1.77. The redemption date is Sept. 3. (See BioWorld Today, Dec. 12, 2002.)

• Viropharma Inc., of Exton, Pa., said compounds from its lead chemical series have shown to have antiviral activity against a range of orthopoxviruses, including monkeypox. They also were shown to be active against smallpox (variola) virus. Scientists from the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Viropharma's collaborator on the project, confirmed the activity of the company's compounds against smallpox virus in experiments at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Viropharma's stock (NASDAQ:VPHM) rose 84 cents Wednesday, or 39.8 percent, to close at $2.95.

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