• Caliper Life Sciences (Hopkinton, Massachusetts) reported the launch of the Caliper LabChip EZ Reader series, delivering a range of products for in-house kinase profiling. The series, which complements the existing LabChip 3000 system, Caliper's system for drug discovery, includes the new EZ Reader II system, a bench-top reader to use for real-time kinetic analysis with push-button operation, and the EZ Reader system, formerly the DeskTop Profiler system. Each product in the EZ Reader series uses Caliper's LabChip microfluidic-based screening technology to yield reproducible data to help pharmaceutical researchers more confidently qualify potential lead candidates. The EZ Reader series features systems that rapidly profile compounds against a diverse kinase panel. The system features a four-sipper Caliper LabChip microfluidic device, while the EZ Reader II system provides a choice of either a 4-sipper or a 12-sipper LabChip device to run assays with up to three times higher throughput. Caliper Life Sciences provides technologies enabling researchers in the life sciences to create life-saving and enhancing medicines and diagnostic tests more quickly and efficiently.

• Cook Medical (Bloomington, Indiana) said it has submitted the final module of its pre-market approval (PMA) application to the FDA for the Cook Zenith TX2 thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular graft. Cook's PMA submission includes safety and efficacy data on about 230 patients who have been treated with the Zenith TX2 in clinical trials. Thoracic aortic aneurysms occur when the section of the aorta that runs down the chest weakens and bulges outward like a balloon. The Cook Zenith TX2, a reinforced fabric tube that is sized to the length of the aorta and covered, is used to seal off the aneurysm. The Zenith TX2 helps to relieve pressure on the aneurysm and reduce the risk of rupture. Cook Medical makes interventional devices.

• SpeechEasy (Greenville, North Carolina), a division of Janus Development Group, reported the release of the new Comfort Fit device, the fourth in the company's line of speech devices that are designed to enhance fluency in individuals who stutter. The company also claims that the device offers improved natural hearing and superior background noise reduction while featuring the most advanced technology available in fluency-enhancing devices. The new device offers lower visibility because of its small size and clear housing, and it also improves hearing by allowing natural sound to enter the ear in which the device is worn. Both ears now receive natural sound, instead of just the one that does not have a device inserted. Similar to a hearing aid, SpeechEasy is worn in or around the ear. But rather than amplify sound, SpeechEasy alters the way a user hears his/her own voice — a change in pitch and a slight delay trick the brain into hearing a second voice speaking in unison. Such "choral speech" can alleviate stuttering. The choral effect has been well documented for decades, but has only recently been scientifically recreated in a small, wireless, wearable device that can be used every day. SpeechEasy specializes in advanced fluency devices.