• A.P. Pharma Inc., of Redwood City, Calif., said the recent public offering of about 24.3 million shares at $1.65 each let the company regain compliance for continued listing on Nasdaq. The company reported on May 15 that Nasdaq was reviewing its eligibility because of low cash. (SeeBioWorld Today,June 15, 2007.)

• AMDL Inc., of Tustin, Calif., through its wholly owned subsidiary Jade Pharmaceutical Inc., signed an agreement with YunNan KunMing YuSi Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., of KunMing, China, to distribute levofloxacin (100ml/bottle). The $921,000 distribution agreement will be effective in July for a term of two years. YunNan is a direct affiliate of the Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense.

• BioDelivery Sciences International Inc., of Morrisville, N.C., said it will voluntarily withdraw its common stock and warrants from listing on the Boston Stock Exchange. The company's common shares will continue to trade on Nasdaq. Since BDSI's initial public offering in 2002, the vast majority of all trading of the company's common stock and warrants has occurred on Nasdaq rather than the Boston exchange. Despite this, the company had maintained the Boston listing in part due to certain exemptions from state "blue sky" laws available to issuers listed on the Boston exchange. Recent changes in SEC regulations make possible BDSI's withdrawal from the Boston exchange, which is expected to take place early next month.

• Callisto Pharmaceuticals Inc., of New York, received notice from the American Stock Exchange indicating that the company is below certain listing standards, specifically that, as of March 31, its stockholders' equity was less than $4 million and the company had sustained losses from continuing operations and/or net losses in three of its four most recent fiscal years. Callisto is expected to submit a plan for review by July 18.

• Genzyme Corp., of Cambridge, Mass., said the FDA approved new labeling for Carticel (autologous cultured chondrocytes), based on the completion of a post-approval commitment study. The label incorporates safety and efficacy data from the Study of the Treatment of Articular Repair as a result of Genzyme's successful completion of that final confirmatory, post-marketing study. Carticel was approved for cartilage repair about 10 years ago. (See BioWorld Today, Aug. 26, 1997.)

• Invitrogen Corp., of Carlsbad, Calif., and Greiner Bio-One, of Frickenhausen, Germany, finalized a licensing agreement to help improve the reliability of Greiner Bio-One's HPV-DNA test PapilloCheck and DNA-array CytoCheck products. The deal covers rights for the use of dUTP (deoxyuridine trophosphate) in PCR-based methods to prevent sample contamination by amplification products in aerosols. Greiner Bio-One is incorporating into two of its DNA arrays a procedure patented by Invitrogen to prevent PCR carryover contamination and, therefore, avoid false positives. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

• Life Therapeutics Inc., of Atlanta, entered a deal with the specialty pharma firm Kedrion SpA, of Lucca, Italy, under which Life Therapeutics will take up a 5.5 percent equity stake in Kedrion and will divest assets from its Life Sera business into a new joint venture company with Kedrion. The existing Life Diagnostics business will continue to be wholly owned by Life Therapeutics. The deal gives Life Therapeutics, focused on niche therapeutic hyperimmune products, exposure to blood fractionation operations. Kedrion is Italy's largest blood fractionator.

• Lipid Sciences Inc., of Pleasanton, Calif., reported in a submission to the National Institutes of Health that the firm has met the study goal of creating a vaccine preparation for severe acute respiratory syndrome. The NIH, under a Small Business Technology Transfer grant, funded the study. Lipid Sciences used its de-lipidation technology to demonstrate proof of principle of the modification of viral particles to be used in preparation of a preventive vaccine against the SARS coronavirus, a lipid-enveloped virus of particular concern as a Category C agent in biodefense applications. The study validated the hypothesis that a modified SARS viral particle could result in an enhanced immunogenic response in an animal model.

• Palatin Technologies Inc., of Cranbury, N.J., and King Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Bristol, Tenn., said the FDA scheduled an end-of-Phase II meeting in August to discuss the clinical study results of bremelanotide in erectile dysfunction. The purpose of the meeting is to determine the safety of proceeding to Phase III, to evaluate the Phase III plan and protocols and to identify any additional information necessary to support a marketing application. Palatin previously reported positive results from Phase IIb trials showing that up to 50 percent of ED patients were restored to a normal level of function with bremelanotide, a melanocortin agonist.

• Phosphagenics Ltd., of Melbourne, Australia, disclosed positive results from preclinical studies with TPM-02 dermal drug delivery technology formulated with retinoic acid, a topical treatment for severe acne and an active ingredient used in anti-aging cosmetics. The proof-of-concept studies showed a threefold increase in the amount of retinoic acid delivered into the skin when formulated with TPM-02, compared to a control formulation, with no retinoic acid detected in the bloodstream.

• Stem Cell Innovations Inc., of Houston, and The High Q Foundation in New York entered a two-year research and development alliance to apply SCI's PluriCells to develop Huntington's disease-specific human cell systems for use in drug discovery. PluriCells, human pluripotent stem cells, are designed to aid in discovery, toxicology and cell therapy. Under the terms, SCI will receive up to $1.1 million from High Q upon completion of certain milestones, and also holds the right to further develop and commercialize the project's outcome.

• Syngenta AG, of Basel, Switzerland, and the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology in Beijing signed a five-year research deal focused on agronomic traits, including drought tolerance for key crops, including corn, soybean, wheat, sugar beet and sugar cane. IGDB forms part of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing and is one of China's leading biotechnology research institutes. Syngenta has rights to commercialize previously and newly developed traits in the agreed range of field crops. Under the agreement, traits not only will be developed for the Chinese seeds market, but also for global agriculture markets. Financial details were not disclosed.

• Toyama Chemical Co. Ltd., of Tokyo, and Hoffmann-La Roche Inc., of Nutley, N.J., entered a licensing agreement for the worldwide research, development and commercialization of Toyama's oral rheumatoid arthritis agent T-5224. By inhibiting a specific inflammatory process, T-5224 has the potential to block signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis as well as the progressive destruction of joint and bone, the companies said. T-5224 is in Phase I trials. Toyama Chemical is entitled to up-front and milestone payments of up to $370 million. It also would get royalties on resulting sales.