• Biomax Informatics AG, of Martinsried, Germany, and Siemens AG, of Munich, Germany, entered an alliance for gene-expression modeling and simulation. Siemens' BioSim product, which recognizes interrelated dependencies within gene-expression data, will produce correlations to be placed in a functional and biological context using the Biomax BioXM Gene Expression Analysis Tool.

• Crucell NV, of Leiden, the Netherlands, and allied contract manufacturer DSM Biologics, of Sittard, the Netherlands, signed a PER.C6 research license agreement with San Francisco-based Synergenics LLC and Synco Bio Partners Investments, of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Synergenics and Synco will use the cell line to develop monoclonal antibodies for infectious diseases. Crucell and DSM will receive an up-front payment and annual maintenance fees. Earlier this month, Crucell and DSM signed a similar deal with London-based GlaxoSmithKline plc.

• Genmab A/S, of Copenhagen, Denmark, said the FDA labeled HuMax-CD4 an orphan drug for mycosis fungoides, which constitutes 75 percent of all cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. The human antibody, which targets the CD4 receptor on T lymphocytes, has the same designation in Europe. The company has run two Phase II studies using HuMax-CD4 to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, one in early stage patients and the other in patients with advanced disease, both of which achieved positive results. It said planning for a pivotal study in mycosis fungoides patients is under way.

• Henderson Morley plc, of Birmingham, UK, applied for permission to start a U.S. clinical study of its ionic contra-viral therapy (ICVT) in Molluscum contagiosum, a skin condition caused by poxvirus, for which there is no antiviral treatment. ICVT works by altering the electrical charge between the inner and outer surfaces of a cell, preventing the growth of viruses. The treatment uses a combination of two drugs that already are licensed for the treatment of other unrelated conditions. Henderson Morley said ICVT has been tested in vitro against herpes simplex I and II, Varicella zoster, cytomegalovirus and adenovirus.

• Icon Genetics AG, of Munich, Germany, entered a collaborative agreement to evaluate the expression levels and quality of preclinical pharmaceutical proteins belonging to Berlex Inc., the U.S. affiliate of Schering AG, of Berlin. Icon will test their expression in transgenic plants using its magnICON biomanufacturing platform technology, which provides a method for producing therapeutic and other recombinant proteins using non-genetically modified organisms, non-food plants as production hosts. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Novosom AG, of Halle, Germany, and Nucleonics Inc., of Horsham, Pa., entered an agreement to develop Nucleonics' expressed RNA interference-based (eiRNA) therapeutics with Novosom's delivery technology. Specifically, the companies will evaluate Novosom's Smarticles formulation technology for the delivery of Nucleonics' lead eiRNA candidates for hepatitis B and C. In addition, privately held Nucleonics has taken an option to exclusively license and commercialize the technology for its eiRNA therapeutics in those indications. Financial terms were not disclosed.

• Odyssey Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Pliva d.d., of Zagreb, Croatia, and Indevus Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Lexington, Mass., launched Sanctura (trospium chloride tablets). The product recently received FDA approval for the treatment of overactive bladder with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence, urgency and urinary frequency. Indevus and Odyssey hired and trained a 480-person sales force to launch the product to primary-care physicians, urology specialists, obstetricians and gynecologists.

• PARI GmbH, of Starnberg, Germany, said its inhaled cyclosporine product received European orphan designation. The company plans to develop it to minimize the risk of graft rejection in lung transplants. It is the first drug the company will privately develop in conjunction with its eFlow aerosol-delivery platform.

• Phytopharm plc, of Godmanchester, UK, is setting up a Level 1 American depository receipt program as a prelude to listing on Nasdaq. Each ADR will be equivalent to two of the company's shares on the London Stock Exchange. Phytopharm does not intend to raise money, but wants to give U.S. investors easier access to its shares and to increase liquidity. The company's portfolio includes anti-obesity products.

• Porton International Inc., of London, sold its interest in DynPort Vaccine Co. LLC, which is focused on the development of biodefense biologics, to Computer Sciences Corp., of El Segundo, Calif. Terms were not disclosed. DVC formerly was a joint venture between Computer Sciences and Porton. Its products include vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin, tularemia, Venzuelan equine encephalitis, anthrax and plague, and a therapeutic blood product, vaccinia immune globulin, to treat complications of smallpox vaccination.

• Sanofi-Aventis, of Paris, was formed following the closure of the merger of Sanofi-Synthelabo SA, of Paris, and Aventis SA, of Strasbourg, France. The deal closed Friday following the settlement of the tender offers, after which Sanofi-Synthelabo controls Aventis with about 95.5 percent of the share capital.

• Vernalis plc, of Reading, UK, said all the conditions of its $400 million North American licensing deal for the migraine treatment Frova with Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Chadds Ford, Pa., were satisfied, and the deal now is completed. Endo will pay Vernalis an up-front fee of $30 million, anniversary payments for the first two years of $15 million, and a $40 million milestone payment if the label is extended to cover menstrual-associated migraine.

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